The Wolf in the Parlor

The Wolf in the Parlor

The Eternal Connection Between Humans and Dogs

Book - 2009
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A man and puppy exhumed from a 12,000-year-old grave sends a two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning science writer on a journey to the dogs

Of all the things hidden in plain sight, dogs are one of the most enigmatic. They are everywhere but how much do we really know about where they came from and what the implications are of their place in our world? Jon Franklin set out to find out and ended up spending a decade studying the origins and significance of the dog and its peculiar attachment to humans. As the intellectual pursuit of his subject began to take over Franklin's life, he married a dog lover and was quickly introduced to the ancient and powerful law of nature, to wit: Love me, love my dog. Soon Franklin was sharing hearth and home with a soulful and clever poodle named Charlie.

And so began one man's journey to the dogs, an odyssey that would take him from a 12,000-year-old grave to a conclusion so remarkable as to change our perception of ourselves. Building on evolutionary science, archaeology, behavioral science, and the firsthand experience of watching his own dog evolve from puppy to family member, Franklin posits that man and dog are more than just inseparable; they are part and parcel of the same creature. Along the way, The Wolf in the Parlor imparts a substantial yet painless education on subjects as far ranging as psychological evolution and neurochemistry. In this groundbreaking book, master storyteller Franklin shatters the lens through which we see the world and shows us an unexpected, enthralling picture of the human/canine relationship.

Publisher: New York : Henry Holt, c2009
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780805090772
Branch Call Number: 636.7 FRA
Characteristics: xiv, 283 p. ; 24 cm

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ReidCooper
Nov 09, 2014

There are some good passages in this book, but the many personal asides feel like a lot of padding. Maybe that works well in the newspaper articles Jon Franklin once wrote, but it didn't work for me. Tellingly, the endorsements on the back of this book include no biologists or anthropologists. Far better to track down a copy of James Serpell's "The Domestic Dog: Its Evolution, Behaviour and Interactions with People" - which Franklin read in manuscript form while writing this book.

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