The Once and Future World

The Once and Future World

Nature as It Was, as It Is, as It Could Be

Book - 2013
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From one of Canada's most exciting writers and ecological thinkers, a book that will change the way we see nature and show that in restoring the living world, we are also restoring ourselves.

The Once and Future World began in the moment J.B. MacKinnon realized the grassland he grew up on was not the pristine wilderness he had always believed it to be. Instead, his home prairie was the outcome of a long history of transformation, from the disappearance of the grizzly bear to the introduction of cattle. What remains today is an illusion of the wild--an illusion that has in many ways created our world.

In 3 beautifully drawn parts, MacKinnon revisits a globe exuberant with life, where lions roam North America and 20 times more whales swim in the sea. He traces how humans destroyed that reality, out of rapaciousness, yes, but also through a great forgetting. Finally, he calls for an "age of restoration," not only to revisit that richer and more awe-filled world, but to reconnect with our truest human nature. MacKinnon never fails to remind us that nature is a menagerie of marvels. Here are fish that pass down the wisdom of elders, landscapes still shaped by "ecological ghosts," a tortoise that is slowly remaking prehistory. "It remains a beautiful world," MacKinnon writes, "and it is its beauty, not its emptiness, that should inspire us to seek more nature in our lives."

Publisher: Toronto : Random House Canada, c2013
ISBN: 9780307362186
Branch Call Number: 304.2 MAC
Characteristics: 256 p. ; 22 cm

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List - BC Book Prize (RPL)
luinealaRPL Sep 08, 2014

Nominee, 2014


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FriendlyTutor
Apr 15, 2015

This book was an interesting and informative look at nature - it's history, full of mega-creatures, and ecosystems - where whale's food supply is sustained on those whales' waste.

The point of the book is more hopeful and realistic than environmental doomsday soothsayers. The reality is that we can survive on a barren, planet. We just have incentives to thrive on a planet that is not barren.

It also reminds us that some environmental activists don't hold a "true" sense of nature, and in fact, few people do. Real nature is not as romantic as some like to think.

A well-written, intriguing read.

m
mclarjh
May 23, 2014

A pleasant and easy to read book, lots of interesting anecdotes and tidbits of fact, but nothing really new.

AnneDromeda Nov 08, 2013

So, um, who needs a palate cleanser after watching Toronto and Ottawa these past couple weeks? I mean sure, it’s been riveting stuff, but when the 24 hour news cycle sucks you down the rabbit hole faster than scripted reality TV, we could all use a little break to get in touch with the bigger picture. JB MacKinnon, co-author with Alisa Smith of *The 100-Mile Diet*, is back with a new book that’s just the thing for a shift in perspective. *The Once and Future World* is a solo venture, but it retains the graceful writing, personal reflections and social conscience that made *The 100-Mile Diet* a hit. MacKinnon grew interested in the changes humans make to our landscapes when he began to learn more about the prairie on which he was raised. To his surprise, the foxes that were ubiquitous in his childhood were imported; grizzly bears used to roam there freely, before being pushed back to the wild, mountainous terrain with which we currently associate them. It made him wonder - in what other ways had we changed the landscape, and what does this loss of wilderness means for nature, for society, and for our psyches? *The Once and Future World* explores all these themes, drawing from disciplines and sources as varied as paleontology, geology, archaeology, climate and social science, and even journal entries from early explorers. *The Once and Future World* could be a depressing book, and I suppose it is in some ways. In many other ways, though, it is a book full of wonder and hope. (Did you just look at your Twitter feed? You need wonder and hope.) MacKinnon investigates rewilding - the idea of reintroducing species to their native habitats, and even back into cities. He’s not wearing rose-coloured glasses about the potential consequences of this; he does document some instances in which corrective rewilding has gone horribly wrong. He doesn’t dismiss its potential, though, and his reasoning is at least compelling, if not convincing for the pessimists and misanthropes among us. *The Once and Future World* is a bona fide dose of sober second thought, highly recommended for anyone whose divine spark is starving on a steady diet of mayoral misadventures and senate shenanigans.

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AnneDromeda Nov 08, 2013

So, um, who needs a palate cleanser after watching Toronto and Ottawa these past couple weeks? I mean sure, it’s been riveting stuff, but when the 24 hour news cycle sucks you down the rabbit hole faster than scripted reality TV we could all use a little break to get in touch with the bigger picture.

JB MacKinnon, co-author with Alisa Smith of *The 100-Mile Diet*, is back with a new book that’s just the thing for a shift in perspective. *The Once and Future World* is a solo venture, but it retains the graceful writing, personal reflections and social conscience that made *The 100-Mile Diet* a hit.

MacKinnon grew interested in the changes humans make to our landscapes when he began to learn more about the prairie on which he was raised. To his surprise, the foxes that were ubiquitous in his childhood were imported; grizzly bears used to roam there freely, before being pushed back to the wild, mountainous terrain with which we currently associate them. It made him wonder - in what other ways had we changed the landscape, and what does this loss of wilderness means for nature, for society, and for our psyches? *The Once and Future World* explores all these themes, drawing from disciplines and sources as varied as paleontology, geology, archaeology, climate and social science, and even journal entries from early explorers.

*The Once and Future World* could be a depressing book, and I suppose it is in some ways. In many other ways, though, it is a book full of wonder and hope. (Did you just look at your Twitter feed? You need wonder and hope.) MacKinnon investigates rewilding - the idea of reintroducing species to their native habitats, and even back into cities. He’s not wearing rose-coloured glasses about the potential consequences of this; he does document some instances in which corrective rewilding has gone horribly wrong. He doesn’t dismiss its potential, though, and his reasoning is at least compelling, if not convincing for the pessimists and misanthropes among us. *The Once and Future World* is a bona fide dose of sober second thought, highly recommended for anyone whose divine spark is starving on a steady diet of mayoral misadventures and senate shenanigans.

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